2007 Media Statistics from Plunkett Research

January 15, 2008 by  
Filed under /Headlines

From Plunkett Research website, these are statistics from 2006-2007 across all the media outlets (Radio, Print, TV, Music, Film, Games, etc).

Entertainment & Media Industry Overview

Amount

Unit

Date

Source

Total U.S. Media Spending

885.2

Bil. US$

2006

VSS

Total U.S. Media Spending

930

Bil. US$

2007

PRE

Annual U.S. Advertising Spending

284

Bil. US$

2007

UM

RADIO

Full Service FM Radio Stations, Including Educational, U.S.

9,163

 

Sep-07

FCC

Licensed AM Radio Stations, U.S.

4,776

 

Sep-07

FCC

Radio Stations Authorized to Broadcasting Digitally, U.S.

1,422

 

Dec-07

FCC

PRINT MEDIA

U.S. Magazine Advertising Revenues, PIB Measured Magazines

24.0

Bil. US$

2006

PIB

Total Daily and Sunday Newspapers, U.S.

2,344

 

2006

E&P

Annual Newspaper Advertising Expenditures, U.S. (Print & Online)

49.3

Bil. US$

2006

NAA

Value of Books Sold, U.S. (Retail Consumer Purchases)

55.6

Bil. US$

2007

BISG

TELEVISION

U.S. Households with Televisions (98.2%)

112

Mil.

2007

NMR

Broadcast TV Stations, Including Class A, U.S.

2,320

 

Sep. 2007

FCC

Basic Cable TV Subscribers, U.S.

65.3

Mil.

Jun-07

SNL

Digital Cable Subscribers, U.S.

36.2

Mil.

Sep-07

SNL

Cable High Speed Data Subscribers, U.S.

34.7

Mil.

Sep-07

SNL

Non-Cable Multichannel Video Program Subscribers, U.S.

32.0

Mil.

Jun-07

NCTA

Cable Telephony (VoIP) Customers, U.S.

13.7

Mil.

Sep-07

NCTA

Number of TiVo Subscribers, U.S.

4.1

Mil.

Nov-07

Tivo

Number of Global Mobile Phone TV Subscribers (Projection)

125

Mil.

2011

In-Stat

MUSIC

Album Sales, U.S.*

588.2

Mil. Units

2006

NSS

Album Sales, U.S., First Half of Year*

271.6

Mil. Units

2007

NSS

Global Downloaded Music Sales, incl. Internet & Cell Phone

2.0

Bil. US$

2006

IFPI

Satellite Radio Subscribers, U.S.

16.3

Mil.

3Q 2007

PRE

Number of iPods Sold during the Fiscal Year ending Sep. 29

51.63

Mil.

2007

Apple

OTHER

Cell Phone Subscribers, U.S.

250

Mil.

Nov-07

CTIA

GGambling Revenues, U.S. (includes all types of legal gambling)

84.65

Bil. US$

2005

AGA

Internet Users, Worldwide

1.24

Bil.

Sep-07

IWS

FILM

U.S. Box Office Revenues

10.2

Bil. US$

2007

PRE

Number of Movie Tickets Sold, U.S.

1.45

Bil.

2006

NATO

Number of Movie Screens, U.S.

38,415

 

2006

NATO

Consumer Spending on DVD & VHS (Rental & Sales), U.S.

23.6

Bil. US$

2006

VB

ELECTRONIC GAMES

Video Game Industry Revenues, U.S.

7.4

Bil. US$

2006

ESA

Video Game Industry Revenues, Worldwide

37.4

Bil. US$

2007

PWC

 
VSS = Veronis Suhler Stevenson; PRE = Plunkett Research estimate;
FCC = Federal Communications Commission; PIB = Publishers Information Bureau;
E&P = Editor & Publisher; NAA = Newspaper Association of America;
BISG = Book Industry Study Group; NMR = Nielsen Media Research;
SNL = SNL Kagan; NCTA = National Cable & Telecommunications Association;
NSS = Nielsen SoundScan; IFPI = International Federation of the Phonographic Industry;
CTIA = CTIA, The Wireless Association; AGA = American Gaming Association;
IWS = InternetWorldStats.com; NATO = National Association of Theatre Owners;
VB = Video Business; ESA = Entertainment Software Association;
UM = Universal McCann; PWC = PriceWaterhouseCoopers;
 
Plunkett’s Entertainment & Media Industry Almanac 2008
Copyright © 2008, All Rights Reserved

2007 Entertainment & Media Industry Trends

January 15, 2008 by  
Filed under /Headlines

(JAN 15, 2008) Plunkett Research, Ltd. is a company that specializes in Industry Statistics, Trends and In-Depth Analysis of Top Companies.  Here they’ve posted an article summarizing Entertainment and Media Industry Trends in 2007 (including advertising).

FULL ARTICLE: 2007 Entertainment & Media Industry Trends

(EXCERPT) The burning issue affecting all sectors of the entertainment and media industry is maintaining control of content and audiences while taking advantage of myriad new electronic delivery venues.  

Competition in the entertainment sector is fierce. Gone are the days when television and radio programmers enjoyed captive audiences who happily sat through ad after ad, or planned their schedules around a favorite show. Consumers, especially consumers in younger demographics, now demand more and more control over what they watch, read and listen to.